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Room with a View

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Room with a View

At the end of the summer I was approached by a woman who was looking for someone who specialized in creating order in small spaces. Her new Brooklyn apartment was almost half the size of her home she was leaving in Portland, OR. While clutter was not her main issue, 600 square feet sounds extremely limiting to most people.  In addition, she had a home full of furniture and needed help deciding what to bring to NYC, what to let go of, and what was worth saving in storage for a future home.

We hit it off immediately and met up in her new space in Dumbo which has an incredible view of downtown NYC. She was prepared with photos of her current home, including the insides of all of her drawers and closets and measurements of her furniture. The closets in the new apartment were small, which immediately has me in search of valuable “dead” vertical space to create more storage while keeping it easy on the eyes.

We followed up with a FaceTime call so I could ask and answer more specific questions before her moving company arrived to pack her up. It was during this call I was able to really hear her worries about space, what items were non-negotiable and her biggest concern, her large sneaker collection.

Once we figured out how much furniture would be enough in her space, I was able to look at 2 empty walls that had the ability to hold about 100 square feet of her personal belongings. This space saving solution is hard to explain, but once I had The Container Store install the elfa shelving, my client was thrilled to see:

a. the unobtrusiveness of the shelving allowing it to showcase or constrain storage

b. the flexible of the shelving heights

c. how much of her stuff easily fit on these solutions

Check out these fun before and afters:

Bedroom wall: the best part about this for me is when you look into the bedroom from the living room, you can’t see the shelves because they are behind the door. My clients favorite part is that she can gaze lovingly at her sneaker collection from her bed ;P

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Living Room wall: this lovely console from Amsterdam was a no-brainer to hold the television but it felt lost in that nook and needed grounding. Creating the shelving around it feels custom yet invisible. My client is able to store all of the things that remind her of friends and family near and far on these shelves.

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Next week I’ll share how we styled her apartment to feature, not compete with, her amazing view.

Have you had to downsize lately? What are some of your favorite space saving tips?

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Before you go all Kondo…

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Before you go all Kondo…

Marie Kondo’s well-timed new Netflix series Tidying Up with Marie Kondo has kicked off the year with a bang for so many people who are ready to let go of the items that do not “spark joy” for them any longer. I have never seen such a response in this field that has so many influencers on social media singing the praises of the Kon-Mari method.

Obviously, this attention to the world of decluttering and organizing is amazing as it has so many people questioning the items in their home, learning how to create systems and even, how to fold clothes.  Whether you love or despise this new craze, I need to bring up something that seems to be missing from the conversation:

Responsible disposal.

I know. Totally unsexy. And even more overwhelming than decluttering or organizing. Please, just hear me out …

I understand this feeling on a larger level because of all of the homes I have helped declutter, purge, organize, unpack and set up systems for over the past 6 years. This problem goes super deep and I’m not going to stress you out with everything I could share.

What I’d like to do is start a conversation with some of the things we can all do right now that are simple and have the greatest positive impact on our environment. We can’t simply do a 180º and expect to all follow a zero waste plan. We also can’t spend weeks trying to dispose of all of the items that should never be in the landfill, it’s not realistic.

Starting this Saturday, January 26 at 12pm EST, I will be going live on my Facebook page each week to discuss the simple solutions we can implement to help us not only declutter our homes but also keep the discarded items going in the right direction.

Come join the conversation!

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Easy does it

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Easy does it

As I mentioned last week, moving is a stressful time. While it seems silly to say ‘Easy does it’, let’s take a moment and understand that during these times of anxiety, we can intend our attitude to be easy about it.
By introducing your current things into a new space, all of a sudden you have to face a lot of stuff that you haven’t thought about in awhile. When we allow ourselves the time and ease to look at these items and thoughtfully consider how we really use them in our spaces, the easier it is to see how necessary they are in our lives. Once we know that they are truly wanted and needed, the better storage and function solutions we can come up with.

I’ve talked a lot in the past about using found items, such as shoe boxes, Tupperware containers, old mugs and glassware, anything that can contain smaller items, to see if containing like-with-like items feels better to you in the interim.

Then, take a couple of weeks to see how these items and your environment are impacted by having containment. You can later revisit with pretty containers that will look good with your decor.

Most importantly, choose your decor and color scheme before you start purchasing containers. Go with neutral or stick to one specific color (lavender and plum are not the same!) We don’t want to draw attention to them - they should become invisible in the space.

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Hold Your Horses

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Hold Your Horses

I’ve been quite lucky this year to help some of my clients move into their new home. I love this process as it’s a clean slate and an opportunity to look with fresh eyes and choose what to keep, what to let go of and what new energy to invite into the space to make it complete.

As we know, moving is a daunting process for most and full of stress. There are a lot of expenses that come along with a move but there is also an opportunity to spend too much simply to cross things off of the list.

This is understandable as living out of boxes and suitcases should not drag along forever and the longer it take to get settled the more frustrating the process becomes.

Here are my best tips for an easier and more successful move:

  1. Closets and storage: What are the needs of your storage spaces and are the closets in your new home set up properly for you? Many make do with what they have and then wonder why the closet is such a disaster. Something as simple as adding a set of shelves, a dresser or a second hanging bar in a closet can be a real game changer. The more you can put away (not hide) in the closets, the more space you have to actually live in.

  2. Furniture: Start with the larger items. This is your bed, the sofa, a place to eat with chairs. These are large in size and also the bare necessities. If you are purchasing a new sofa or furniture, realize that it can take 10-12 weeks to receive these items so planning ahead really matters.

  3. Patience, please: Wait for the larger items to arrive before rounding out the space. Prior to having a new sofa or chairs arrive, you are looking at your space from a 2D perspective. These items take up vertical space which is something you have to experience to know it’s right and how to determine the right size coffee table, accent chairs or shelving. The number one problem I see is not only too much furniture in a room, but also furniture that is too large for the space.

Moving is never going to be stress-free, but with a strong and malleable plan and the self-restraint to build up on what is working first, you can have a space that will make you happy for years that feels perfect for your needs.

Are you moving anytime soon? Please share your number one concern in the comments.

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Clutter vs. Collections

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Clutter vs. Collections

This year for Thanksgiving, my husband, brother, mother and I spent two night in an Airbnb in Kingston. We celebrated the day in Poughkeepsie with my in-laws and friends but because I waited too long to book, there was nothing closer that would accommodate all of us except for hotel rooms.

As one would imagine, I am particular about where I stay. If the photos don’t convey the vibe I’m looking for, I rule it out immediately. Obviously, clear space is important to me and I like to have good lighting and a functional kitchen.

The home we found in Kingston had simple and functional furniture which showed off the original wood plank floors and antique details of the home.

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Our hosts Atsuko & Saturo, created a lovely environment full of gorgeous plants and an interesting collection of old tools which were displayed on mantle shelves on one wall and around the space in various locations. The diversity of the industrial tools, organic plants and streamlined furniture was a pleasure to experience and made the space feel balanced.  

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Seeing all of the wonderful things we created conversation around, which is generally missing from hotel environments, got me thinking about the difference between collections and clutter. Here are a few things I came up with:

  1. A collection has a theme and is limited to a color or focus

  2. Collections can be displayed as artwork

  3. Collections don’t take up space on work surfaces

  4. Collections are thoughtfully planned

We had a beautiful stay in Uptown Kingston, although it took every ounce of strength for me to not to take the enormous fern and my brother to leave behind the giant cutters above the fireplace ;)

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Change is a Biotch

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Change is a Biotch

With the change of seasons here on the East Coast, it’s a sloppy time of tank tops and flip flops navigating with sweaters and boots. My closet can become as eratic as the weather if I don’t have a plan. While most people say they like change, the reality is they don’t like the sloppy steps it takes to get there.

I see the blind eye people cast upon their messy closet. A shopping spree ensues instead of transitioning and eliminating. By embracing the changing of the seasons as an opportunity to get ahead of the chaos, we are in control. It’s a time to review what we wore, delete what’s outdated and know what our true needs are to round out our fall wardrobe.

Here are some thoughts to help you through this process:

1. Nothing is forever: Well, diamonds I guess, but that’s generally not the quality of items you need to wade through to organize a closet. It’s amazing to me how quickly the items that were so important three years ago, and sometimes only three months ago, are no longer meaningful now. You can’t trust that the way you felt in the past is the way you’ll feel forever. When you understand your own cycle of change, it becomes easier to release what’s no longer serving you. This is why it’s so important to go through, look at and touch it all, and see where your feelings have changed.

2. We are constantly evolving: The resistance that comes with going through our wardrobe is that we are forced to face our poor choices head on. It’s understandable to want to avoid this, but if we can work objectively, and investigate without judgement, we will see our shopping patterns. Who you are now is not who you were a year ago. If we study our layers of stuff, we can start recognizing our patterns. You may be surprised how this information helps you resist future impulse purchases. It’s a perfect moment to identify what becomes meaningless over what period of time. A year, a week? This is the first step to start recognizing waste before you bring it home.

3. Create the change: While it may seem easier to avoid this work altogether, you’ll need to face it at some point. Better to schedule an afternoon to take stock than to realize as you’re already late for work that the sweater you suddenly need because the temperature dropped overnight is now stretched out and ill-fitting. Yes, it takes an investment of time, but that time is on your terms, rather than creating stress when you least need it.

 
 

4. Let’s do it together!: Join me live on FB this Sunday, September 23 from 2-4pm EST and I will show you exactly how I change over my clothes and will answer questions live throughout. This will be a great way to hold each other accountable and learn strategies going forward to help you stay on top of this in the future. The only requirement is that you do all of your laundry before we start!

If you haven’t already, like my business page and be alerted when I go LIVE! Looking forward to “seeing” you then!

Will you be joining me? Let me know in the comments.



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The Devil is in the Details

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The Devil is in the Details

I have been known in the past to get hyper-focused on small details. I love macro photography and have kicked myself for not capturing a full scene while traveling for context. Like the image above of this beautiful on-brand teal jellyfish. There were loads of them on the beach and I only took individual closeups that day.  With this awareness, I have to remind myself in my work to pull back and make sure the whole is working before I finalize the fun finishing touches.

For my recent office update, I kept avoiding the Kallax shelving unit. Sometimes the big open areas of these shelves make it challenging to store without feeling cluttered. This was much easier to get away with when I had the shelves going the long way along the ground because they weren’t in my sightline. Now they were right in my face and I needed them to be functional and beautiful.

What wasn’t working?
-precious items often got knocked over or covered up because the scale of the shelf is too big
-shelves were too deep for books
-divide shelves without creating dead space

Big picture:
I decided to dedicate the left side to business and the right side to personal. Rather than splitting up top and bottom sections, this keeps me focused on both areas of my life to keep balance on my mind.

Browse options:
I’m not even sure what led me to the Ikea website, but I was thrilled to find the perfect solutions for my needs. I purchased all three not knowing if I could or would use them all. I intuitively tried them out in several ways:

-I immediately loved the Shelf Divider, even though I was uncertain if I would use it vertically or horizontally, or on the left side or right side. I love the way it breaks up the heaviness of books and allows me to divide by topics. 

-The Shelf Insert ended up being ideal for my altar, holding all of my precious items vertically without being lost on a shelf. This easily pops out for access to storage behind it. 

-The “Storage with Compartments” shelf was the perfect way to elevate my essential oils with plenty of room behind them for my tarot and inspirational cards. It allowed space underneath for the basket I bought in Nicaragua from the Women’s Collective to hold other necessities.

I’ve always loved The Container Store’s Water Hyacinth Storage Cubes and they bring a beautiful organic quality to these otherwise basic linear shelves. I was happy to place these on the bottom as they act like glorified drawers and give a sense of grounding to the unit. Best to only store larger items in these bins otherwise they become a mess instantly. On the left side I’ve placed items to give to my nieces and friends. The right side has all of my Theta healing manuals so I can easily grab them either before or after I meditate.

 
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Play around:
These shelves were on my mind for a few weeks before I started to arrange them. I kept refining and asking what was truly needed to serve my needs. When I was finally ready to take action, I had no agenda. I was ready to return any of the items that didn’t work and I wouldn’t have considered it a failure. It's important to remember that organizing is not a one and done solution. It is a continuous study of what’s working and what’s not, and always asking the question, “what would be better?”

Pick an area in your home and ask “What would be better?” Please share with us in the comments.
 

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Creating Personal Space

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Creating Personal Space

Wow! I really took my time with my office project. My pace is usually very quick but balancing my time with editing my book, working with clients and completing my office was definitely a challenge this go around. 

Here are my top 3 tips to help you stay on track and persevere to completion:

1. Your vision needs to be clear and inspiring: I started this project because I couldn’t believe how quickly my office had become a dead zone in my home filled with piles of crap. Granted, I had organized piles of crap - and they were absolutely uninspired. I avoided walking into my office because it just didn't feel good to me. This was the perfect opportunity to walk my talk and look at what was missing from my life: a place to do handstands, a place to meditate, and an inspiring and creative workspace. These were truly important to me and the touchstone to keep me moving throughout the project, even when weeks went by without time to work on it. Your vision doesn’t have to be a picture, it can be a feeling, a memory or even a new way of being. When things get tough or you get off course, remember that everything is ok and keep connecting to your vision. 

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2. Take it step by step: While planning sounds boring to some, I love it. Sure, I have my moments of flying by the seat of my pants and making changes on the fly; being adaptable is absolutely necessary. It’s also really important to understand the steps needed to get to the end. Getting the project out of your head and onto paper is the first step, and it creates ease. When the next step feels overwhelming, it means it needs to be broken down further. Sometimes a step may simply be to keep going when your amygdala is trying to protect you from the scary reality of change. Talk kindly to it and say, I am safe, change is good. Anticipating and welcoming these steps are signs of progress. I was blocked trying to figure out these shelves and IKEA came to the rescue with their perfect made-to-fit partitions.

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3. Celebrate the small victories along the way. As a culture, we are trained to focus on what’s wrong. During a transformation, you have to get through a mess in order to see the light. There is a lot of trust required to get through. If all you can celebrate is that you gave your neighbor an appliance or put a book out on the stoop, celebrate the fact that you were able to let go. It gets easier as momentum builds. Some celebrations may be that it didn’t turn out exactly as you expected. Look for the surprises, happy accidents are part of the fun. The vision and the plan are what help you take action, they are not the absolute end point, merely a direction. Many people get frustrated when they can’t find the exact solution they wanted. Rather than making it (or yourself wrong), expect that something better is on it’s way. 
 

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I didn’t plan on this little creative station on my desk, but I became inspired when I was at The Container Store for a meeting and saw this gold tray. The cup for the paintbrushes is technically for toothbrushes and the glass container I found in the kitchen department.  Remember to think outside of the box when looking for the proper containers. As I mentioned last week, trays are a beautiful way to create order. This little detail may be may favorite part of the whole transformation.

What could clearing some space in your home invite into your life?  Please share in the comments!


 

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For the Love of Boundaries

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For the Love of Boundaries

During the pursuit of re-organizing my office, I’ve found cluttery items around that needed a new solution. This week I will share how to strategically use trays and containers that create a sense of “collections” on your desk or tabletop, rather than clutter. Not unlike the boundaries we need for ourselves, these physical boundaries, as small as they may seem, are crucial to create ease in our everyday lives.

1. Test first: As I’ve recommended in the past, always test out any container with a found object before committing to a new purchase. Too many times I’ve witnessed “The Island of Misfit Containers” in my clients homes when they rush the purchase of pretty organizers without measuring or testing first. And like most people with clutter, you probably have lids of small boxes, or even shoe box lids that will be perfect for the trial period.

Example:  I used the bottom of a pretty little box that my reading glasses came in to hold the essential oils I used during my work day. All of my oils have a home in my bathroom, but for sake of efficiency, it made more sense to have zones for the oils that I used more frequently in different areas of my home on a regular basis.

2. What would be better?: After utilizing the new temporary container for a few weeks, start paying attention to what’s working and what isn’t? Is the location making sense? Is the tray too big or too small? What color would disappear into the background? Would labeling the container be helpful? Would a box make more sense than a tray?

Example: My box lid was proving to be a bit too small. I needed to fit about 5 more bottles and the taller roller bottles were tipping over. Even though the blush color was pretty, it didn’t coordinate well with my current palette.  

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3. Measure and source: Once you have realized the size, shape and color that would work best, take some quick measurements and start looking online or in stores to see what they have. Keep in mind that this may be the first of many containers you may choose to add to your space. It’s always best to stick with a neutral color as you may have to use different sources to find the sizes you need. Also, think outside of the categories they are sorted into. I have found great office trays in kitchen departments and pencil holders in the bathroom departments. Shop for the look and feel you are going for.

Example: I found the perfect container for my oils at Muji. I stopped there for another reason and was pleasantly surprised when I found this odd sized bin that was perfect for my needs. I went with a bamboo box as I have another bamboo container already on the shelf it will be sharing, and I like to stay away from plastic and use renewable resources like bamboo when possible. 

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There are a few more collections for me to create before my office is complete. Little by little it’s getting there, and I’m grateful that I’ve managed to stay patient and do it the right way. 
 

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Research & Plan

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Research & Plan

Much of my success with projects not only has to do with my experience, it also has to do with stopping and taking time to plan. All of the previous mistakes I have made by not planning has also taught me how many problems and additional time can be avoided by really thinking through the project from start to finish. For anyone who haven’t done a particular project before, research is your best friend.

I have never wallpapered. My mother wallpapered every wall in our home except for the kids bedrooms. I remembered it seeming like a pain in the ass at the time. Wallpaper has always symbolized “old-fashioned” to me and I’ve never really considered it. Over the past few years there have been great strides in this market with cool graphics and inspired modern designs. 

As I mentioned last week, wallpaper was not my first solution. I went with the super creative and overwhelming idea to paint a mural of birch trees. Wallpaper was the best solution with the time and resources I had available. I know removing wallpaper is a huge nightmare, so the self-adhesive option was the only way I would consider doing it, especially since I know that I get bored easily and didn’t want to be locked in. 

Before purchasing the paper, I read hundreds of reviews wanting to understand other people’s perspectives. What’s interesting about reviews is you have to read between the lines to consider: a. if the person writing speaks intelligently and offers helpful insight, b. the complaints are not just from one or two reviewers and c. that the person writing isn’t just being a jerk. It’s a tricky process but I do it before any big purchases and even some small ones. 

After reading many reviews on Amazon, there were some comments that made me realize I wanted a textured wallpaper that added depth to the overall effect, which they weren’t offering. I didn’t even know textured was an option.  One reviewer had mentioned the peel and stick wallpaper at Target and the reviews were mostly favorable, so I went for it.

Another website had a calculator to know how many rolls to order so I used that to find the quantity I needed. One of the reviewers said it was important that all of the lot numbers matched, meaning they were printed at the same time to avoid color or printing variations. I could only find the 4 rolls I needed online and when they arrived, there were 2 different lot numbers. I called my local store, and they said they had 2 rolls with one of the lot numbers I already had. When I went to pick it up, none of the numbers matched. I opted to keep what I had and hoped for the best.

Other reviewers said it was impossible to match up the pattern of the brick - super important to make it look good. I am extremely patient with this kind of stuff, so after reading a few more reviewers who explained how many inches the pattern repeated, I knew I could figure it out. I finally found a couple of hours one Sunday when I was supposed to be editing my book, and decided it was time to do this project. At least my procrastination helps me be productive in other areas of my life.

I went on YouTube to find step-by-step instructions and step one was to wash the walls and wait 24 hours. UUUUGGHGHGH! But I wanted to do it now!  I had to really talk myself out of proceeding, and the key reason I didn't move forward was because of all of the reviewers who had posted photos of their wallpaper that fell down overnight. That was my biggest concern but I quickly realized that probably happened because they didn’t follow the instructions. 

As you will see in the time lapse video below, This really was a breeze for me to do. I think beginning to end it was 3 hours, although I had to take breaks to speak with a few clients that afternoon. The hardest part was matching up the last three areas. It wasn’t easy, and you will notice, I spent as much time on those last spots as I did on the whole wall.

 
 

Overall I am beyond thrilled although I still have some work to do to complete the space. I am happy to report that I have meditated, done handstands, yoga and even mini trampoline workouts here. The space already feels refreshed and I’ve even spent time working at my desk!

Please share in the comments: Have you ever wallpapered? Would you? Why or why not?

 

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Size matters

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Size matters

Recently while working with a client, I was reminded of one of the most common mistakes I see: The giant sized storage container. 

I understand why someone might think this is a good choice. It can hold a lot and it’s easier than buying a bunch of smaller containers. It appears to solve problems. The truth is, it creates many problems that we don’t think of until it’s too late.

I was helping my client by transforming the closets and storage areas in her Master and Guest bedrooms. Her previous renovation left her with extremely heavy wood sliding doors that were very difficult to open as they had never been on track properly. We ended up choosing The Container Store’s TCS Closets which are customizable and quite lovely. 

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Once we made it through the challenging demolition and installed the beautiful new closets, we worked on making order of her previously stored items as the space had changed. We found several jumbo sized bins that held her holiday items. My client had lovely upholstered and padded bins that held all of her precious and delicate ornaments. They were quite organized and luckily those bins fit perfectly back in the top of the new closets. The rest of the Christmas paraphernalia: wrapping paper, bows, cards, tissue paper and decorations, were randomly placed in 3 gigantic bins. 

Much like when we move, I recommend adhering to bins and boxes no larger than what a case of liquor comes in. This is not only a back saver; when storing anything up above your head, or that requires us to get on a step stool or ladder to access, it needs to be a more manageable size to protect us from getting injured.

 
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When we have the big bins, we fill them up, and while the items I listed don’t sound heavy, in a container that large, it’s awkward, unbalanced and very difficult to navigate. I chose The Container Store’s Deep Sweater Box which allowed us to separate all of the items into categories and will be much easier for my client to access when needed from her new beautiful closets.

 
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There are so many different sized storage containers because there are so many different things we can store. It’s great to keep in mind that the smaller an object you are storing is, the smaller the container needs to be. For example, when storing sewing supplies, it’s good to have a bin for fabric, a bin for thread and smaller containers for needles and thimbles. Those smaller bins can then live inside the fabric or thread bins. When the possibility exists for stuff to roll around or create a mess, dividing and conquering is the only way to go.

One may wonder what to use those big bins for. Ideally, we want to store lightweight large items, like extra comforters or pillow. Maybe rolls of bubble wrap or packing supplies.

Where do you have big bins that could use a bit of love? Please share in the comments!
 

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Use What You Have

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Use What You Have

I’m still in Lagos having an incredible week with these lovely and inspiring ladies. I’ll report back next week about the trip in its entirety. In the meantime, I’ll tell you about one of my attempts to loosen the grip of my ziplock bag addiction.

I love glassware, especially the super thin and fragile kind. In the past, my heart has broken every time a glass was dropped. I come from a family who still has wine glasses from over 30 years ago, so I recognize that I was taught to believe glasses lasted forever. My husband comes from the idea that glasses break, so there’s no attachment for him.

My mother-in-law Jocelynn and I have had a tradition of making strawberry jelly for years. Since Ross loves it on top of his ice cream, we ended up having a bunch of mason jars around the house. One day I decided, even though they don’t have the thin lip that I prefer, that these were going to be our new drinking glasses. These glasses have broken as well, but I don’t feel quite as sad when they do.

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Several years ago, I came across these great BPA free lids which I love because they don’t rust out like the normal metal tops do. I love that I can write on the lids to store things as well. Now my glassware doubles as food storage. This doesn’t completely solve all of my ziplock needs, but it greatly reduces the amount that I would normally use.

Mason jars have had a renaissance for those who are looking to live without plastic for many years and now there are quite a few additions to the variety of lids and accessories available. There are lids with silicone straws for kids, lids to create soap dispensers, and silicone sleeves to protect your glass if you take your iced coffee to go.

Let me know in the comments below, is there anything in your home that you can create another use for?

 

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Storage strategy

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Storage strategy

 

Happy Thursday, 

Tomorrow I'm organizing a storage space for a client. This video explains my plan. Next week I'll let you know how it went.

Have a fantastic weekend! 

 

P.S. Soul Camp is less than 2 weeks away and I would love to see you there! Give yourself the gift of self-care and fun! Here's a link to save $100. Monthly payment plans available :)

 

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Got junk?

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Got junk?

 

Happy Thursday!

This week I'm celebrating the return of my husband after 6 weeks.  I'm also celebrating my amazing experience with 1-800-got-junk. Check it out!

Have a lovely weekend!

 
 

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